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The Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) and the Justice Research and Statistics Association (JRSA) are together on a series of projects designed to improve state criminal history records through analysis of key topics of interest to state justice decisionmakers. In the first project, nine State Statistical Analysis Centers (SACs) were selected to study recidivism of sex offenders released in 2001 using criminal history records data. The SACs were required to develop the capacity to obtain and analyze their states' criminal history records, or in the case of SACs that already had this capacity, to participate in a study of sex offender recidivism using the criminal history records data. SACS then provided feedback to their state criminal history repositories on errors in the data discovered as the analyses were undertaken. This ongoing process of analysis and correction of data in the files is aimed to help improve the overall quality of the data in the criminal history records.


The American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry's Give Back a Smile program is dedicated to providing cosmetic dental care at no cost to all survivors of domestic violence.


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in conjunction with the National Institute of Justice and the U.S. Department of Defense, is developing the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Surveillance System (NISVSS). This survey will sample households to establish incidence and prevalence estimates on intimate and sexual violence and stalking. The CDC also administers the Domestic Violence Prevention Enhancement and Leadership Through Alliances (DELTA) program, which provides funding to states to develop prevention strategies.


End Violence Against Women International manages the OnLine Training Institute (OLTI), offering free access to training on the criminal justice response to sexual assault.

In Focus has developed domestic violence shelter software called Alice. Alice is currently being used in 20 states. The software is customizable and provides yearly upgrades.


The National Center for State Courts will also conduct a 24-month study assessing the courts' capacity to assist Limited English Proficient (LEP) battered women in obtaining and enforcing civil protection orders. The primary goal of the Serving Limited English Proficient Battered Women: A National Survey of the Court's Capacity to Provide Protection Orders project is to collect national-level information on access to protection orders for non-English speaking women. Secondarily, the project will identify model court practices that can be implemented nationwide.


The US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has created the Homeless Management Information System (HMIS). This nationwide data collection system gathers individual information on clients in local facilities, including domestic violence service providers. The system collects a wide range of information, including whether the client is or was a victim of domestic violence.


National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Projects

NIJ, through its Violence and Victimization Research Division, provides funding for various research projects related to violence against women. Ongoing projects can be found on the NIJ Grants page.


Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) Projects

  • Domestic Violence Homicide Prevention Demonstration Initiative
    The Office of Violence Against Women (OVW) initiated the Domestic Violence Homicide Prevention Demonstrative Initiative (DI) to implement domestic violence homicide reduction and prevention models and evaluate how well they work in different communities, as well as the key components of successful adaptations of the models. In addition, the DI will help build the capacity of state, local, and tribal jurisdictions to improve identification of and services for high risk victims while better monitoring high-risk offenders to reduce domestic violence related homicide. It is OVW's hope that the DI will also identify barriers to providing quality assistance and advocacy and document and disseminate solutions for replication.


  • Transitional Housing for Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Stalking and Sexual Assault
    The OVW provides grants to programs that provide assistance to victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking who are in need of transitional housing, short-term housing assistance, and related support services.


  • President's Family Justice Center Initiative
    In October of 2003, President George W. Bush announced the President's Family Justice Center Initiative (PFJCI), which is administered by the OVW. The PFJCI is a pilot program that has awarded more than $20 million to 15 communities across the country for the planning, development, and establishment of comprehensive domestic violence victim service and support centers. The goal of the PFJCI is to make a victim's search for help and justice more efficient and effective by bringing professionals who provide an array of services together under one roof. The 15 PFJCI sites host advocates from non-profit groups, representatives from victim service organizations, law enforcement officers, probation officers, governmental victim assistants, forensic medical professionals, attorneys, chaplains, and representatives from community-based organizations.


  • Project Access
    Funded under the Office of Violence Against Women, Education and Technical Assistance Grants to End Violence Against Women with Disabilities Program, this project provides technical assistance to 22 grantees representing 19 different states. The goals of the program are to create greater options, services and remedies for women with disabilities experiencing sexual assault, stalking and/or domestic violence. The project challenges barriers that exist within the service provider community and public institutions that limit women with disabilities who have experienced violence from accessing services, and create a national coordinated response among service providers.


  • STOP Violence Against Women Formula Grants Program
    The STOP (Services, Training, Officers, and Prosecutors) Violence Against Women Formula Grants are awarded to states to develop and strengthen the criminal justice system's response to violence against women and to support and enhance services for victims.


  • Grants to Encourage Arrest Policies and Enforcement of Protection Orders
    This discretionary grant program is designed to encourage state, local, and tribal governments and state, local, and tribal courts to treat domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking as serious violations of criminal law requiring the coordinated involvement of the entire criminal justice system.


  • Rural Domestic Violence and Child Victimization
    This discretionary grant program is designed to enhance services available to rural victims and children by encouraging community involvement in developing a coordinated response to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, and child abuse.


  • Legal Assistance for Victims
    This discretionary grant program is designed to strengthen civil and criminal legal assistance programs for adult and youth victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking who are seeking relief in legal matters arising as a consequence of that abuse or violence.


  • Campus Program
    This program is designed to strengthen the higher education community's response to sexual assault, stalking, domestic violence, and dating violence crimes on campuses, and to enhance collaboration between campuses and local criminal justice and victim advocacy organizations.


  • State Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Coalitions
    The Office awards grants to each state domestic violence coalition and sexual assault coalition for the purposes of coordinating state victim services activities and collaborating and coordinating with federal, state, and local entities engaged in violence against women activities.


  • Tribal Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Coalitions
    This discretionary grant program is designed for increasing awareness of domestic violence and sexual assault against American Indian and Alaska Native women, enhancing the response to such violence at the tribal, federal, and state levels, and providing technical assistance to coalition membership and tribal communities.


  • Enhanced Training and Services to End Violence and Abuse of Women Later in Life
    This discretionary grant program is designed to address the issue of elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation, including domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking against victims who are 50 years of age or older, through training and services.


  • Education and Technical Assistance Grants to End Violence Against Women with Disabilities
    This discretionary grant program is designed to provide training, consultation, and information on domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, and sexual assault against individuals with disabilities and to provide direct services to such individuals.


  • Safe Havens: Supervised Visitation and Safe Exchange
    This discretionary grant program helps create safe places for visitation with and exchange of children in cases of domestic violence, child abuse, sexual assault, or stalking.




  • State Projects

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    Alabama

    No current projects.

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    Alaska

  • Differences in the Nature and Processing of Reported Sexual Assault by Offenders' Military Affliation
    The Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center will analyze crime data from the Anchorage Police Department, as well as data from the Anchorage Department of Health and Human Services (SANE), Alaska Department of Revenue, and Alaska Department of Law to determine whether case processing differs depending upon the offender's military affiliation. Funded by the National Institute of Justice.


  • Investigative Strategies for the Successful Prosecution of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV)
    The Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center will examine how investigative strategies affect the successful prosecution of IPV cases. More precisely, the Center will examine the extent to which (1) the thoroughness and timeliness of the officer’s investigation, (2) whether a follow-up investigation was performed, and (3) whether a local police presence is available, affect case outcomes and reasons for case outcomes. Funded by the National Institute of Justice.


  • Descriptive Analysis of Domestic Violence in Alaska
    The Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, with the Alaska State Troopers, will collect information from a sample of domestic violence incidents reported to the Troopers in 2002 and 2003. This information will be paired with information on the outcomes of these cases from the Department of Law. The final report will provide a detailed description of domestic violence in Alaska and an examination of how case characteristics affect case outcomes.


  • Video on Court Procedures for Domestic Violence Restraining Orders
    The Alaska Court System's Family Law Self-Help Center and the University of Alaska Justice Center produced a 20-minute video explaining how to apply for a domestic violence protective order in an Alaska state court. It includes information about the ex parte (20 day order) and long term (1 year) protective orders, highlighting important issues for parties with children, specifically the temporary nature of custody granted and the different considerations for visitation planning (schedule, location, transportation, third party involvement, safety considerations). The video also discusses the need for safety planning, special issues for victims in rural communities, and immigrant victims. There are versions in English, Spanish and Yup’ik, all available online.


  • Campus Crime
    The Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center has compiled statistics on the number of murders, sex offenses, robberies, aggravated assaults, burglaries, motor vehicle thefts, arson, theft/larceny incidents, and Minor Consuming Alcohol (MCA) citations reported on the University of Alaska Anchorage campus since 1991.


  • Sexual Assault Response Team (SART) Data Collection Project
    The Alaska Forensic Nurses Association, working in conjunction with the Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, has created a database to capture incident-based information from all of the 11 Sexual Assault Response Team programs in Alaska.


  • Analysis of Sexual Assault
    The Alaska State Troopers, working in conjunction with the Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, has created a database to capture incident-based information from all of the sexual assault cases reported to the State Troopers in 2003 and 2004. This information will be paired with information on the outcomes of these cases from the Department of Law. The final report will provide a detailed description of sexual assault in Alaska and an examination of how case characteristics affect case outcomes.


  • President's Family Justice Center Initiative
    The PFJCI is a pilot program administered by the Office on Violence Against Women that has awarded more than $20 million to 15 communities across the country for the planning, development, and establishment of comprehensive domestic violence victim service and support centers. The goal of the PFJCI is to make a victim's search for help and justice more efficient and effective by bringing professionals who provide an array of services together under one roof.
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    Arizona

  • Analysis of Sexual Assault of Spouses Criminal History Records

  • The Arizona Criminal Justice Commission's Statistical Analysis Center will be analyzing the criminal history records of offenders who sexually abuse their spouses.

  • Arizona Domestic Violence Legal Assistance Project

  • The Project is administered by the Arizona Foundation for Legal Services and Education and supported through contracted funding by the Arizona Department of Economic Security. The project is a collaborative effort between domestic violence shelters and legal service to provide civil legal assistance and lay legal assistance to victims of domestic violence.

  • Rural Safe Home Network

  • The Arizona Department of Health Services' Division of Public Health Services operates the Rural Safe Home Network, which provides domestic violence hot lines, temporary safe shelter, peer counseling, case management, and advocacy.

  •  Grants to Encourage Arrest

  • The Governor's Office, City of Phoenix Prosecutor's Office and Municipal Courts, Maricopa County Adult Probation, the Sojourner Center and the Arizona Coalition Against Domestic Violence are collaborating on a program to identify first-time domestic violence offenders who are at high risk for re-offending and place them on intensive probation. The program, funded by the Department of Justice, also funds offender treatment and programs to help victims of domestic violence navigate the legal system.

  • Rural Domestic Violence and Child Victimization

  • Three counties that border Mexico (Pima, Santa Cruz and Cochise) have received funding from the Department of Justice to coordinate battered immigrant women teams tasked with educating and training professionals, surveying existing culturally specific programs and service gaps, and devising community awareness plans through partnerships with nonprofit domestic violence victim service programs and other community stakeholders.

  • pdf document Governor's Innovative Domestic Violence Prevention Awards

  • This project is designed to fund innovative and creative prevention programming that focuses on the needs of children who have experienced/witnessed violence in their homes or programs that enable victims to create a violence- and substance-free lifestyle. Ten agencies received awards in 2005-2006: Against Abuse, Inc.; Amity Foundation, Circle Tree Ranch; Chyrsalis Shelter; La Frontera; Maricopa Association of Governments; New Life Center; Pima County Attorney's Office; Sojourner Center; Southeastern Arizona Behavioral Health Services, Inc.; and Time Out, Inc.

  • Children's Justice Task Force

  • Through this project, local agencies receive funds to develop, establish and operate programs designed to improve the:
    • Handling of child abuse cases, particularly cases of child sexual abuse
    • Handling of cases of suspected child abuse or neglect-related fatalities
    • Investigation and prosecution of cases of child abuse, particularly child sexual abuse and exploitation
    Agencies receiving funds in 2005 include Apache County - Little Colorado; Coconino County - Safe Child Advocacy Center; Graham/Greenlee County - Parenting AZ; Maricopa County - Childhelp USA; Navajo County - County Attorney's Office; Pima County - Southern Arizona Children's Advocacy Center; Pinal County - County Attorney's Office; Yavapai County - Yavapai Family Advocacy Center; and Yuma County - Amberly's Place.

  • State Agency Coordinating Team

  • All state agencies that fund domestic violence-related services have joined together to form the State Agency Coordinating Team. Facilitated through the Governor's Division for Family Violence Prevention, agencies meet monthly to share information and coordinate efforts. An annual report is produced for the State Legislature.

  • Committee on the Impact of Domestic Violence and the Courts

  • As part of the Arizona Supreme Court, this committee makes recommendations with regard to policies which acknowledge the severity of the problem of domestic violence in Arizona. It recommends system changes to promote enhanced safety for victims and the professionals who interact with them. Membership includes judges, attorneys, law enforcement, DV service providers and coalitions, and public members.

  • STOP Violence Against Women Formula Grant

  • The STOP Violence Against Women Formula Grant is awarded by the U.S. Department of Justice Office on Violence Against Women to the Arizona Governor's Office for Children, Youth and Families' Division for Women. The state of Arizona receives approximately $2m dollars annually that are awarded through a competitive process to law enforcement, prosecution, courts, and victim service programs across the state that address violence against women. Some of the activities supported through the STOP Grant have been: development of a statewide Court Protective Order Repository; establishment of domestic violence courts; development of specialized law enforcement and prosecution teams; sexual assault crisis services; battered immigrant self-petitioning assistance; legal advocacy; the establishment of Family Advocacy Centers; and the hiring of a domestic violence court trainer, advocates, specialized sexual assault detectives, and master-level sexual assault therapists.

  • Accessing Safety: Promising Practices in Serving Crime Victims with Disabilities

  • The Southern Arizona Center Against Sexual Assault received funding from the Office of Victims of Crime for a 3-year project. In the first year, the project conducted a needs assessment and formed the Southern Arizona Sexual Violence Disability Coalition. Now in its second year, Accessing Safety is implementing strategies and projects to serve crime victims with disabilities. Among other efforts is the creating of a Promising Practices Handbook for Center Against Sexual Assault staff, forensic nurse examiners and law enforcement partners.

  • Sexual Assault Response Services (SARS)

  • The Sexual Assault Response Service is a 24-hour/7 day-a-week hospital response team providing services to recent survivors of sexual assault. A SARS advocate can respond to any Tucson hospital emergency department to provide victims/survivors with immediate crisis intervention and advocacy, as well as information about the victim's/survivor's options and rights. When authorized by law enforcement, a specially-skilled Sexual Assault Forensic Examiner is able to provide a forensic medical exam and evidence collection. SARS also facilitates a victim's/survivor's entry into longer-term support, as well as into Arizona's criminal justice system.

  • Su Voz Vale

  • Su Voz Vale, or Your Voice Counts, is a community action program of the Center Against Sexual Assault based on the south side of Tucson. The goal of the program is to reduce the incidence of and trauma associated with sexual violence for the Latino/Chicano population. Su Voz Vale is a bilingual/bicultural program providing culturally relevant and appropriate services.

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    Arkansas

  • Sexual Assault Investigation and Management Training for Rural Law Enforcement

  • The National Center for Rural Law Enforcement at the Criminal Justice Institute, University of Arkansas, in a collaborative effort with the National Center on Domestic and Sexual Violence, provides education and training on sexual assault to rural law enforcement executives and rural investigators. This project is funded through a cooperative agreement with the Office on Violence Against Women.

  • Clothesline Project

  • Created by Arkansas Coalition Against Domestic Violence in 1994, the project is a collection of approximately 300 hand-decorated T-shirts displayed on a clothesline, with each T-shirt representing a woman killed in Arkansas by an intimate partner from 1989 to 2000.

  • Silent Witness Project

  • Created by Arkansas Coalition Against Domestic Violence in 1995, the Silent Witness Project consists of life-sized plywood cutouts painted red and black. Each cutout represents a female victim murdered by an intimate partner from the most recent year and tells the victim's story on a shield attached to the cutout.

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    California

  • pdf document California Courts Protective Order Registry
    The California Courts Protective Order Registry (CCPOR) is a judicial branch project to create a statewide protective order repository that will provide more complete, accessible information on restraining and protective orders. Access to protective orders through CCPOR will be available 24 hours a day, seven days a week (24/7) in all court jurisdictions and venues. By promoting victim safety and perpetrator accountability, the CCPOR supports the Judicial Council’s strategic Goal IV, Quality of Justice and Service to the Public, and the related operational plan objective (IV.1.e) of improving “practices and procedures to ensure fair, expeditious, and accessible administration of justice for litigants in domestic violence cases.”


  • Spousal Abuser Prosecution Program
    The Spousal Abuser Prosecution Program in the California Department of Justice seeks to help both victims and prosecutors of domestic violence offenses. Through program grants supporting "vertical prosecution," district attorneys and city attorneys are able to develop teams that specialize in the investigation and prosecution of domestic violence offenses. Victims are able to work with the same prosecutor and investigator from the time charges are filed through the sentencing of the offender. Trained counselors/advocates also work with the victim to make the trial process less traumatic and overwhelming.


  • American Indian Women Domestic Violence Assistance Program
    The American Indian Women Domestic Violence Assistance Program provides culturally appropriate services to American Indian Women victims of domestic violence. Program objectives include a crisis line, information and referrals, emergency shelter referrals, emergency food and clothing, emergency transportation, counseling, assistance with temporary restraining orders, culturally appropriate trainings, and community education programs.


  • pdf document Domestic Violence Assistance Program
    The Statewide Domestic Violence Assistance Program (DVAP) is designed to: 1) provide local assistance to existing service providers to maintain and/or expand services for victims of domestic violence and their children, based on need as demonstrated by prior service statistics, local crime statistics, current population and population projections, economic factors, geographic and cultural factors; and 2) provide local assistance for the development and establishment of domestic violence services to currently unserved and underserved populations, including, but not limited to, rural areas, non-English speaking groups, minorities, or geographical areas without services.


  • Domestic Violence Response Team Program
    The Domestic Violence Response Team (DVRT) includes a domestic violence advocate and a law enforcement representative. It may also include a domestic violence deputy district or city attorney, a probation officer, and a hospital representative or health care provider. The DVRT is designed to immediately respond to the secured scene of a domestic violence incident in person or by telephone when requested by law enforcement and provide crisis intervention services. If law enforcement does not request immediate response, the DVRT advocate must follow-up with the domestic violence victim within 48 hours of notification of the incident from law enforcement to provide intervention services.


  • pdf document Family Violence Prevention Program
    The Legislature designed this program to provide family violence prevention education and to increase general awareness of family violence prevention programs. Grantees collect and disseminate statewide, model protocols for intervention systems and provide training to agencies in dealing with family violence prevention.


  • pdf document Farmworker Women's Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Program
    The purpose of this program is to develop and implement activities that educate and increase awareness of sexual assault and domestic violence among monolingual and bilingual Spanish-speaking and low-income farmworker women.


  • Law Enforcement Specialized Units
    The purpose of this program is to continue the efforts of law enforcement agencies to enhance or create specialized units to focus special effort on the handling of violent crimes against adult women, including sexual assault, domestic violence, and stalking. The specialized units accomplish this purpose through thorough investigation, immediate victim advocacy, and training for law enforcement officers. Thorough investigation leads to successful prosecution of cases, immediate victim advocacy provides victims with the support and resources to help disrupt the cycle of violence, and training assists departments in providing a consistent, effective, and compassionate response to female victims of violent crime.


  • pdf document Medical Training Center Program
    The purpose of this program is to ensure that forensic medical examinations are conducted statewide in a standardized, consistent and qualified manner by training medical personnel who perform examinations for child sexual and physical abuse and neglect, adult sexual assault, domestic violence and elder/dependent adult abuse. Training on evidentiary examination procedures is also provided to investigators and court personnel involved in dependency and criminal proceedings. This is accomplished through the development of a wide variety of curriculum guidelines and provision of training courses.


  • Native American Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Program
    Native American sexual assault and domestic violence victims are severely underserved due to the lack of conveniently located or culturally sensitive services, lack of information regarding the dynamics of sexual assault and domestic violence and, in some cases weak linkages between tribal communities and non-tribal criminal justice and victim services systems. This project addresses sexual assault and domestic violence among this population.


  • pdf document Rape Crisis Program
    The program funds 84 rape crisis centers that service all 58 counties. Rape crisis centers assist sexual assault victims in dealing with the emotional trauma inflicted by the assault, provide assistance as these victims progress through the criminal justice system, and provide community education programs.


  • Rural Domestic Violence & Child Victimization Enforcement Program
    The purpose of this program is to enhance the safety of victims of domestic violence, dating violence, and child abuse by supporting projects uniquely designed to address and prevent these crimes in rural America.


  • Sexual Assault Response Team (SART) Program
    This program provides funding for Rape Crisis Center victim advocates to support and participate in the development and/or enhancement of local SART efforts to improve multidisciplinary responses to sexual assault victims.


  • pdf document State Coalition Technical Assistance and Training Program
    This project provides training and technical assistance to domestic violence service providers throughout the state. In addition, program funds are used to organize and coordinate efforts of victim service providers throughout California.


  • Statewide SART Collaboration Program
    This project provides assistance to develop and coordinate Sexual Assault Response Teams (SART) in California to ensure effective community sexual assault response systems. The objectives are: 1) development, enhancement and improvement of SART systems and efforts; 2) availability of effective, comprehensive sexual assault response systems for sexual assault victims; 3) identification of key procedures and protocols; and 4) coordination of SART policy needs.


  • Threat Management and Stalking Vertical Prosecution Program
    This program provides funds to District Attorney’s Offices to create or enhance specialized units to reduce the threat of victimization related to the crime of stalking through early arrest, prosecution, and sentencing of perpetrators charged with this crime. This program concentrates efforts and resources toward this offense, utilizing special investigators and vertical prosecution of offenders.


  • Violence Against Women Vertical Prosecution Program
    The purpose of this program is to fund specialized units in prosecutor’s offices in California to vertically prosecute crimes against women, including sexual assault, domestic violence, stalking, and dating violence. Vertical prosecution has shown to improve conviction rates, reduce victim trauma, and provide more consistent and appropriate sentencing.


  • California Restraining and Protective Order System
    The California Department of Justice (DOJ) houses the California Restraining and Protective Order System (CARPOS), a statewide database of persons subject to a restraining order. This database can only be accessed by court clerks and law enforcement. The CARPOS allows reported violations of restraining orders to be added to the existing restraining order record in the CARPOS. The violation message is designed to allow law enforcement and criminal justice agencies the capability to enter reported restraining order violations onto any record in the CARPOS. This information may assist prosecutors in building stalking cases and other types of criminal cases involving someone who has been the subject of a restraining order.


  • Domestic Violence and the Courts
    With funding by the California Department of Health Services (DHS), Epidemiology & Prevention for Injury Control (EPIC) Branch, this project supports continued education for judges and court personnel through the administration of stipend and mini-grant programs. It also provides information on batterers' fines collections per county through quarterly reports from the Domestic Violence Education and Training Fund.


  • Juvenile Domestic and Family Violence: The Effects of Court-Based Intervention Programs on Recidivism
    The National Center for State Courts (NCSC), in collaboration with the American Probation and Parole Association (APPA), will conduct a 24-month study of the effectiveness of intervention programs in the area of juvenile domestic/family violence. The project's goal is to document the effectiveness of court- and probation-based intervention programs on offender recidivism and post-treatment behaviors. Participant sites include the Santa Clara (CA) Juvenile Domestic and Family Violence Court, the San Francisco Youth Family Violence Court, and the Contra Costa County court system.


  • Public Policy and Research Committee
    The Public Policy and Research Committee of the California Partnership to End Domestic Violence works to improve domestic violence policy in California by advocating for legislation that increases protections for domestic violence victims and funding for support of programs. Members of the committee are representatives from the field of domestic violence throughout the state who draft, monitor, and testify in support of or against legislation related to domestic violence victims or service providers.


  • Spousal Abuser Prosecution Program
    The Spousal Abuser Prosecution Program in the California Department of Justice seeks to help both victims and prosecutors of domestic violence offenses. Through program grants supporting "vertical prosecution," district attorneys and city attorneys are able to develop teams that specialize in the investigation and prosecution of domestic violence offenses. Victims are able to work with the same prosecutor and investigator from the time charges are filed through the sentencing of the offender. Trained counselors/advocates also work with the victim to make the trial process less traumatic and overwhelming.


  • Teen Relationship Violence: An Examination of Juvenile Court Cases and Interventions
    Researchers from San Jose State University, supported by a grant from the National Institute of Justice to the National Center for State Courts, are comparing domestic violence courts in Santa Clara County, San Francisco County, and Contra Costa County to examine effectiveness and recidivism.


  • President's Family Justice Center Initiative
    The PFJCI is a pilot program administered by the Office on Violence Against Women that has awarded more than $20 million to 15 communities across the country for the planning, development, and establishment of comprehensive domestic violence victim service and support centers. The goal of the PFJCI is to make a victim's search for help and justice more efficient and effective by bringing professionals who provide an array of services together under one roof. The Alameda County Family Justice Center combines more than 50 organizations and 150 people working together to aid victims of domestic violence and their families.


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    Colorado

    No current projects.


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    Connecticut

  • Family Violence Arrest Trends and Homicides

  • The Central Connecticut State University Institute for the Study of Crime and Justice is currently examining family violence incidents for upcoming publications.

  • Anger Profiles and Characteristics of Incarcerated Sex Offenders

  • The Central Connecticut State University Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice has received a grant to examine the characteristics of sex offenders currently in prison.

  • Connecticut College Consortium Against Sexual Assault

  • The Consortium is composed of representatives from Connecticut colleges and universities, as well as individuals from community services and programs, who work to improve the response to and prevention of sexual violence.
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    Delaware

  • Firearms and Domestic Violence
    The Office of Management and Budget's Statistical Analysis Section is working on a domestic violence firearms study as part of the Project Safe Neighborhoods. Staff will analyze offender to victim relationship for all 2005 firearm offenses.


  • Domestic Violence Prevention Enhancement and Leadership Through Alliances (DELTA)

  • Thanks to funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Delaware Coalition Against Domestic Violence (DCADV) has worked with state advocates and community partners to build their capacity to provide services in the community. Delaware is one of 14 states to participate in this national collaborative since 2002, and is currently charged with doing work nationally, on a state-level, within the Coalition's organization, and with local communities to cultivate prevention efforts using a public health approach.

  • Committee for Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender Concerns

  • The Committee for Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender Concerns (CLGBTC) of the Delaware Coalition Against Domestic Violence (DCADV) works to raise public awareness about the incidence, prevalence, and seriousness of partner abuse in same-sex relationships and to advocate for improved criminal justice and social service response to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender domestic violence.

  • Women of Color Task Force

  • The Task Force is organized by the Delaware Coalition Against Domestic Violence (DCADV). It was established in 1999 and meets monthly to discuss and develop strategies regarding the outreach and delivery of domestic violence services to communities of color. It strives to increase public awareness of domestic violence through support, education and training.


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    District of Columbia

  • Court Advocacy Program (CAP)
    The Court Advocacy Program (CAP), managed by Survivors and Advocates for Empowerment is located in the Domestic Violence Intake Center at DC Superior Court and the DVIC Southeast Satellite (DVICSE) at Greater Southeast Community Hospital. CAP staff provide court-based advocacy services to between 20 and 30 victims every business day-- over 4,000 clients each year.


  • On-Call Advocacy Program (OCAP)
    The Court Advocacy Program (CAP), managed by Survivors and Advocates for Empowerment created the On-Call Advocacy Program (OCAP) to provide on-call staff and volunteer advocates for domestic violence victims who contact the Metropolitan Police Department between 6:00PM and 6:00AM, and 24 hours a day on weekends and holidays, when DC Superior Court services are unavailable. OCAP advocates are available to meet with a victim at a safe location, or speak with them on the phone.


  • Court Watch
    Court Watch is a volunteer-staffed project managed by Survivors and Advocates for Empowerment in which trained observers record information about Civil Protection Order hearings. The data gathered by Court Watch volunteers are published in semi-annual reports. The Court Watch project provides advocates with information about how the court deals with domestic violence, and provides feedback to the Court regarding its treatment of domestic violence survivors. The goals of this project are to improve the court experience for those seeking relief, and to give survivors a larger voice in the court system.


  • Coalition Building Project
    The DC Coalition Against Domestic Violence is working to build alliances between service providers, educators, lawyers, advocates and victims to reduce the provision of duplicate services, identify service gaps, and determine what services could be provided jointly.

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    Florida

  • Cut Out Domestic Violence

  • The Office of the Attorney General is sponsoring this initiative to provide hair-care professionals with training seminars throughout Florida. Topics will include the prevalence of domestic violence in Florida, signs of domestic violence, and how to discuss domestic violence with clients. Participants will receive referral information on domestic violence programs in Florida and a certificate of attendance. Salon professionals will not be encouraged or required to report suspected cases of abuse, but will be a vital resource to victims by being prepared to provide helpful information about available resources in their communities.

  • Domestic Violence Prevention Enhancement and Leadership Through Alliances (DELTA)

  • Since 2002, the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence (FCADV) has worked with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to develop and implement the Domestic Violence Prevention Enhancement and Leadership Through Alliances (DELTA) program. In 2003, FCADV organized a DELTA Oversight Committee composed of a diverse group of state-level professionals whose responsibilities include offering guidance and support to the State Coordinator and assisting with monitoring local projects. In 2006 the Oversight Committee expanded as its responsibilities evolved to include being responsible for creating a statewide prevention plan. The Committee is now referred to as DELTA State Steering Committee.

  • Disabilities Program

  • The Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence (FCADV) provides many resources to certified domestic violence centers for enhancing service provision to survivors living with mental health complexities. These resources include onsite and electronic training and technical assistance as well as educational materials.

  • Economic Justice Iniative

  • The mission of the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence's (FCADV) Economic Justice Initiative is to provide training, information and resources to address the economic conditions that create barriers to the long-term independence and safety of survivors and their children. Ultimately, Economic Justice means fairness and equality for survivors to have the ability to make decisions about their lives and intimate relationships without fear of negative financial impact.

  • Welfare Transition Program

  • Provided by the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence's (FCADV), the Welfare Transition Program is Florida's plan for providing eligible families with services that will assist them in becoming self-sufficient. Services include:
    • Job Search, Job Preparation, and Job Placement
    • Education and Training
    • Case Management and Counseling
    • Subsidized Child Care
    • Transportation Assistance
    • Relocation Assistance

  • Healthy Advocate Initiative

  • The Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence's (FCADV) is sponsoring this initative, encouragine advocates from Florida's 42 domestic violence centers to participate in the 4-week Challenge to Change. Advocates all over the state have been increasing their physical activity, eating healthier and smoking less.

  • Rural Initiative

  • The mission of the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence's (FCADV) Rural Initiative is to provide for the safety of the most isolated and endangered victims of domestic and sexual violence in rural areas within the state of Florida. The Initiative is based on the community organizing model whereby the community and judicial organizing is essential to the long-term success of direct services provided to rural victims.

  • Statewide Domestic Violence Fatality Review Team

  • The Department of Children and Families (DCF) has received an award from the Grants to Encourage Arrest Policies and Enforcement of Protection Orders Program, administered by the Department of Justice, to partner with the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence (FCADV) to create a statewide domestic violence fatality review team. The two year grant will enable the statewide team to meet four times to:
    • Identify gaps in service delivery to domestic violence victims and identify potential systemic breakdowns
    • Promote training and cross-training to professionals
    • Coordinate the activities of agencies involved and share and exchange information

  • Teen Violence Among Runaway and Homeless Youth

  • The Department of Children and Families (DCF) has introduced a new program created to assist Florida's domestic violence advocates, sexual violence and rape crisis advocates, and runaway and homeless youth service providers with the issue of teen dating violence. Teen Dating Violence Among Runaway and Homeless Youth includes a user-friendly curriculum complete with practical information regarding the complexities and dynamics of dating violence. One goal of the project is to increase domestic and sexual violence advocates' and runaway youth workers' knowledge of and competency in direct service provision to runaway adolescents who experience dating violence. Both intervention and prevention strategies are explored and a wealth of resources is provided including protocols for working with youth experiencing teen dating violence.

  • President's Family Justice Center Initiative
  • The PFJCI is a pilot program administered by the Office on Violence Against Women that has awarded more than $20 million to 15 communities across the country for the planning, development, and establishment of comprehensive domestic violence victim service and support centers. The goal of the PFJCI is to make a victim's search for help and justice more efficient and effective by bringing professionals who provide an array of services together under one roof. One of the first centers, the Family Justice Center of Hillsborough County brings together over 60 partners to provide services to domestic violence victims.

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    Georgia

  • Rural Domestic Violence and Child Victimization
    The Georgia Coalition Against Domestic Violence and the Georgia Commission on Family Violence are working with four rural shelters to design and implement a multidisciplinary community response for addressing co-occurring cases of child abuse and domestic violence. Advocates will collaborate with child protective service workers, public and private agencies, and community service programs in mobilizing within the respective geographic areas to assess co-occurring cases and facilitate service provision. The project also seeks to implement a task force enhancement component, which will provide critical training and technical assistance to rural task forces in developing a community-wide plan for the safety of battered women and their children.



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    Hawaii

  • Na Wahine Team International
    The Na Wahine team is fighting domestic violence and sexual assault to form a comprehensive response to issues of violence against women through cross-disciplinary training programs.


  • Hawaii State Commission on the Status of Women
    Hawaii State Commission on Status of Women (HSCSW) works for equality for women and girls in the state by acting as a catalyst for positive change through advocacy, education, collaboration and program development.



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    Idaho

  • President's Family Justice Center Initiative
  • The PFJCI is a pilot program administered by the Office on Violence Against Women that has awarded more than $20 million to 15 communities across the country for the planning, development, and establishment of comprehensive domestic violence victim service and support centers. The goal of the PFJCI is to make a victim's search for help and justice more efficient and effective by bringing professionals who provide an array of services together under one roof. One of the first centers, the Nampa Family Justice Center brings together a variety of partners to provide services to domestic violence victims.



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    Illinois

  • Consequences of Childhood Exposure to Intimate Partner Violence.
    The goal of this study is to explore the causal effects of exposure to intimate partner violence, and to identify the theoretical perspectives that best explain any identified effects. Three major policy issues will be relevant to these results: 1) the criminalization of exposure to intimate partner violence; 2) funding for interventions that focus on children exposed to intimate partner violence; and 3) the concept of in-house treatment for victims of battering and outpatient treatment for batterers. The project will use longitudinal data taken from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods.




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    Indiana

  • Legal Resource Project
    This project is designed to help fill the legal needs of domestic violence victims in Indiana. The overall goal of this project is the development of a comprehensive legal advocacy and representation system that will assist victims of domestic violence throughout Indiana. A major component of this project is to provide centralized legal resources for domestic violence service providers, prosecutors, victims, legal aid centers, and others who assist domestic violence victims.


  • Region Women Initiative
    This Northwest Indiana project has two focus areas - research and culture. The first phase, running through 2006, consists of a public policy report, a three-part cultural series and the launch of the first regionally based academic journal. The initiative is driven by community volunteers working together to stimulate public dialogue at the regional level on issues affecting region women's quality of life.


  • President's Family Justice Center Initiative
    The PFJCI is a pilot program administered by the Office on Violence Against Women that has awarded more than $20 million to 15 communities across the country for the planning, development, and establishment of comprehensive domestic violence victim service and support centers. The goal of the PFJCI is to make a victim's search for help and justice more efficient and effective by bringing professionals who provide an array of services together under one roof. One of the first centers, the Family Justice Center of St. Joseph County opened in January 2007.

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    Iowa

  • National Resource Sharing Project
    Created by the Iowa Coalition Against Sexual Assault, the project helps state sexual assault coalitions across the country access resources. The project is designed to provide technical assistance and support, and to facilitate peer-driven resources for all state and territorial sexual assault coalitions.


  • Iowa Protective Order Notification for Domestic Abuse Program (IPONDA)
    A statewide automated victim information and notification system that provides domestic violence, sexual assault, harassment and stalking victims with information and notification on the service status of their protective or no contact orders, as well as notification when a protective or no contact order is about to expire. This system enables transmission of a new no-contact order directly from the courts to law enforcement to permit immediate notification of the protected party.



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    Kansas

    No current projects.


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    Kentucky

  • Domestic Violence Protective Order Project
    The University of Kentucky's Center for Research on Violence Against Women is continuing a study begun in 2005 with the support of the Kentucky Supreme Court. The primary aim of this study is to improve an understanding of how protective orders work for victims of intimage partner violence in the Commonwealth. The Center and Supreme Court are working collaboratively to access ten years of data on the issuance, service and denial of orders of protections, including criminal history data.


  • Victimization and Fear of Crime Among College Women
    In FY 2004, University of Kentucky's Center for Research on Violence Against Women undertook a research project with a primary aim to contribute to the safety of women on the campus of the University of Kentucky. Study investigators developed a survey instrument patterned after the one used for the National Violence Against Women Survey and the National College Women Sexual Victimization Survey and administered the instrument to over 1,000 female students to gather information about their fear of crime and victimization history. Those data were prepared in a report form for University of Kentucky's President and were used to inform a substantial campus safety effort that resulted in $1.25 million in funding for campus programs. In order to continue to link research to the campus safety efforts now spearheaded by the Division of Student Affairs/Women's Place, the University of Kentucky Police Department and others, in the spring of 2007, the Center conducted a replication of the Women's Safety Study. The 2007 replication surveyed 2000 female University of Kentucky students and 200 students from Kentucky State University.


  • Incarcerated Battered Women Study
    In 2006, the University of Kentucky's Center for Research on Violence Against Women began a study to explore the influence of offender gender and victim type (intimate, non-intimate or child) in the sentencing and parole board decisions in cases of intimate partner homicide in order to provide a descriptive analysis of the experience of battered women who kill intimate partner offenders. The study will also compare one state's experience with a statutory exemption from the violent offender statute for domestic violence victims. During 2007, the project team conducted comprehensive, on-site reviews of prison case records for 260 women and 260 men who are or have been incarcerated in a Kentucky prison for homicide, manslaughter or felony assault committed between 1999 and 2004.


  • Homicide and Domestic Violence: A Research Brief
    In 2006, the University of Kentucky's Center for Research on Violence Against Women completed data collection for a pilot study exploring homicide and intimate partner violence. Data were extracted from autopsy records associated with women whose cause of death was homicide in collaboration with the Medical Examiners Offices across Kentucky.



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    Louisiana

  • Domestic Violence in the African American Community
    As part of the Safe Havens initiative funded through the Department of Justice's Office of Violence Against Women, Rainbow Research is working with the Institute for Domestic Violence in the African American Community to explore the extent to which African Americans, Native Americans and other people of color utilize supervised visitation programs in four distinct communities-Anadarko, OK; New Orleans, LA; Queens, NY and Zuni, NM-as well as review the culturally appropriate practices of these programs.


  • President's Family Justice Center Initiative
    The PFJCI is a pilot program administered by the Office on Violence Against Women that has awarded more than $20 million to 15 communities across the country for the planning, development, and establishment of comprehensive domestic violence victim service and support centers. The goal of the PFJCI is to make a victim's search for help and justice more efficient and effective by bringing professionals who provide an array of services together under one roof. The Family Justice Center of Ouachita Parish provides services from a variety of on-site partners.
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    Maine

  • Statewide Strategic Plan to Reduce Violence Against Women
    With a grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Maine Department of Human Services, Maine Commission on Domestic and Sexual Abuse, and the Maine Primary Care Association are teaming up to integrate and implement a strategic plan to reduce violence against women in the state.


  • Enhancing Safety: Domestic Violence Project
    With a grant from the Violence Against Women Office, the Maine District Court is expanding the Domestic Violence Coordination Project with three additional courts. Courts in York and in Portland have successfully developed a model that improves service to citizens involved in domestic violence cases. Key elements of the project include: coordination of information about other court cases (criminal, divorce, family) that involve the same people; increased judicial monitoring of the offenders' compliance with court orders; and training and improved practices for judges, clerks, prosecutors, bail commissioners, law enforcement, victim services, probation officers, and others participating in the project.

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    Maryland

  • Statewide Civil Domestic Violence Database
    The Maryland Network Against Domestic Violence and the Maryland Administrative Office of the Courts have received a grant to create a statewide civil domestic violence database.


  • Stages of Change and the Group Treatment of Batterers.
    One individual difference in response to treatment among batterers may be readiness to change, best conceptualized by the stages of change (SOC) model. It is the purpose of this project to: 1) compare the effectiveness of a 26-week SOC group treatment with a standard 26-week cognitive-behavioral gender-reeducation (CBTGR) group treatment; 2) assess the integrity of the two treatments with respect to therapist adherence, therapist competence, and processes of change; 3) conduct exploratory analyses on individual readiness to change as a moderator of treatment condition in predicting outcomes; and 4) conduct exploratory analyses comparing the effectiveness of these two approaches in Spanish-speaking groups. Two hundred and forty court-ordered English-speaking male batterers will be randomly assigned to one of two treatment conditions, for a total of 12 groups in each condition and 10 men per group. In addition, 80 court-ordered Spanish-speaking male batterers will be randomly assigned to one of the two conditions, for a total of four groups in each condition. Effectiveness will be indicated by: a) increased involvement in treatment (lower attrition, higher working alliance, higher group cohesion); b) increased readiness to change; and c) desistance from violence (according to batterer self-report at post-treatment and partner reports at post-treatment, 6- and 12-month follow-up). Groups will be conducted over the course of two years at the Montgomery County, Maryland, Abused Persons Program (APP), with initial, mid-group, and post-treatment assessments collected on all group participants. Initial, post-treatment, 6-month and 12-month partner follow-up assessments will be collected as a function of Montgomery County APP's participation in a project funded by the CDC (R49/CCR 319813-01) to predict batterers' response to treatment.


  • Sexual Assault in Maryland: The African-American Experience.
    In this project, researchers conducted a needs assessment of African-American women who are residents of Maryland and who have been sexually assaulted. Analyses of the results examined whether differences exist by race in terms of details of assault, reporting to police, and medical and counseling services received, and also to determine if these differences are due to race alone or to other variables such as geographic location, age, and socioeconomic status.


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    Massachusetts

  • Provider Sexual Crime Report
    The Provider Sexual Crime Report (PSCR) is a data collection instrument that was created to help understand the volume and characteristics of rape and sexual assault in Massachusetts. Medical providers in Massachusetts are required by law to fill out a PSCR for every sexual assault and rape where the victim sought medical treatment. The PSCR provides detailed data on sexual crimes that commonly go unreported to police and as a result are not recorded or tracked in official statistics. The Research and Policy Analysis Unit of the Executive Office of Public Safety analyzes PSCR data to construct a detailed picture of sexual assaults and rapes in Massachusetts where the victim sought medical treatment.


  • Homeless Prevention Initiative
    Although the focus is not directly on domestic violence, the John W. McCormack Graduate School of Policy Studies' Center for Social Policy is evaluating the Homeless Prevention Initiative (HPI), a collaborative project involving five foundations that pooled $3 million in resources for the implementation of homeless prevention services, which are carried out by 18 Massachusetts nonprofit organizations over a three-year period. The CSP evaluation team is currently at a mid-point in the three-year evaluation, and using both quantitative and qualitative data collection approaches, aims to generate cross-site process and outcome information that will have relevance for state policymaking. More recently, CSP has been contracted to evaluate several other homeless prevention projects, including the state's RAFT program. Using multi-method and cross-site/cross-project analytical approaches, products from the multiple evaluations are designed to be used widely by practitioner, policy, advocacy, philanthropic and other mainstream audiences.


  • President's Family Justice Center Initiative
    The PFJCI is a pilot program administered by the Office on Violence Against Women that has awarded more than $20 million to 15 communities across the country for the planning, development, and establishment of comprehensive domestic violence victim service and support centers. The goal of the PFJCI is to make a victim's search for help and justice more efficient and effective by bringing professionals who provide an array of services together under one roof. One of the first centers, the Family Justice Center of Boston opened in 2005.


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    Michigan

  • Justice System Response to Intimate Partner Violence in Asian Communities. Grant 2005-WG-BX-0009
    This study is a joint effort between the University of Michigan School of Social Work and the Asian & Pacific Islander Institute on Domestic Violence. The investigators plan to provide empirical evidence to identify factors that promote and hinder effective interventions in Asian communities in response to domestic violence. The study will employ a face-to-face semi-structured interview method to collect data from 320 Asian battered women on: 1) the types and life course trajectories of interpersonal violence experienced; 2) longitudinal trajectories of contacts with the criminal justice system; 3) factors associated with help-seeking; 4) responses of criminal justice system components such as police, prosecution, and courts; and 5) the relationship between contacts with criminal justice and women's safety/well-being over time.


  • Analysis of Domestic Violence in Michigan Using NIBRS/MICR Data
    Funded by the Bureau of Justice Statistics , the Michigan State University's Michigan Justice Statistics Center will conduct a study of intimate partner violence by analyzing Michigan Incident Crime Reporting (MICR) data. While an overall statewide examination will be conducted, analysis will also be conducted by region, county, major city, and urban vs rural areas. In addition to reporting the number of incidents, the researchers will also look at rates based upon jurisdiction population. Density maps will be created to depict areas of high concentrations of incidents across the state. A final research report, aimed at improving the investigation of intimate partner violence by law enforcement, will also be available.


  • Sexual Assault Surveillance System (SASS)
    Funded by the Michigan Department of Community Health, the SASS is an ongoing systematic collection, analysis and interpretation of sexual assault data for use in planning, implementation, and evaluation of sexual assault polices in Michigan.


  • Domestic Violence Information System Coordination and Research Project (DISCAR)
    DISCAR will develop, implement, and evaluate information systems at the local level to provide information on domestic violence incidents in Michigan.


  • Marquette Research for Justice and Violence Agencies
    The Marquette Research for Justice and Violence Agencies (MR JAVA) is a three-year project funded through the Michigan Department of Community Health. Michigan State University is the university partner responsible for the evaluation component, providing resources, and facilitating community relations. The purpose is to reduce domestic violence through community collaboration and coordination of intervention agencies. This project is implementing community-wide change through a variety of methods.


  • pdf document An Intersectional Analysis of Domestic Violence: Understanding the Help-Seeking Decisions of Marginalized Battered Women
    Researchers at Michigan State University are collecting data from women in two urban cities in Michigan to identify barriers to seeking services. The research will use interviews of the largely marginalized population to determine how and why women make the decision of whether or not to seek help.




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    Minnesota

  • Crime Victimization Survey

  • The Minnesota Statistical Analysis Center is working with the University of Minnesota's Center for Survey Research to ask a statewide sample of 800 Minnesotans about their crime victimization and perceptions of crime in their communities. This information will be analyzed by a variety of demographics, including geographic location, gender, and age.

  • Human Trafficking Task Force

  • The 22-member task force are developing a public awareness campaign around the issue of human trafficking, creating a statewide training plan and exploring the current services available for victims of human trafficking. The task force will focus on both sexual trafficking of women and children and labor exploitation.

  • Interagency Task Force on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Prevention

  • The Minnesota Legislature created the Interagency Task Force on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Prevention (IATF) during the 2000 legislative session and charged the task force with developing a statewide strategic plan to address and formulate:
    • Recommendations on how to reduce the incidence of domestic violence and sexual assault
    • Recommendations on how to coordinate existing resources at the federal, state and local levels to reduce the incidence of domestic violence and sexual assault, including specific proposals on how these governmental entities may better cooperate
    • Recommendations for changes in policies and laws to reduce the incidence of domestic violence and sexual assault
    • Recommendations on the need for increased services and resources to reduce the incidence of domestic violence and sexual assault
    • Other items deemed appropriate by the task force.
    Each year, the Task Force presents these recommendations in a report to the legislature.

  • Minnesota Department of Health's Injury and Violence Prevention Upcoming Projects

  • The Injury and Violence Prevention unit has several projects planned:
    • Examining criminal justice data from orders-for-protection files with the Supreme Court
    • Using multiple mortality data sources to examine intimate partner homicide
    • Identifying homicide mortality in the state using newspaper clippings
  • A Comprehensive Needs Assessment of Rural Violence

  • With the support of the Bush Foundation in St. Paul, MN, and the Minnesota Department of Public Safety - Office of Justice Programs, the Center for Reducing Rural Violence (CRRV) has engaged the services of Rainbow Research to conduct a comprehensive needs assessment of rural violence in Minnesota in two phases:
    • Examine proven violence indicators in rural Minnesota as well as trends in violence covering the period 1995 to 2005 across urban, suburban, and rural areas, including rural tribal communities
    • Convene local and regional stakeholders across the state to discuss the impacts of violence in rural communities, current violence prevention and intervention practices, and barriers and public policy needs in addressing, resisting, and preventing violence.
    The needs assessment will also provide a unique set of data never before collected in Minnesota, including information about challenges of violence facing rural communities, the barriers and successes they have met in dealing with these, met and unmet needs, and gaps in service. Information will be collected in key informant interviews and focus groups with local law enforcement and criminal justice experts, public officials and community residents.

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    Mississippi

    No current projects.

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    Missouri

  • President's Family Justice Center Initiative
    The PFJCI is a pilot program administered by the Office on Violence Against Women that has awarded more than $20 million to 15 communities across the country for the planning, development, and establishment of comprehensive domestic violence victim service and support centers. The goal of the PFJCI is to make a victim's search for help and justice more efficient and effective by bringing professionals who provide an array of services together under one roof. The St. Louis Family Justice Center provides services from a variety of on-site partners.
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    Montana

  • Crisis Resource Center

  • The Montana Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence and Voices of Hope have received a grant from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine to create and maintain a Crisis Resource Center for mental health, sexual assault, and domestic violence service providers.

  • Montana DELTA Project

  • The Montana Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence has received funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for the Domestic Violence Prevention Enhancement and Leadership Through Alliances (DELTA) project. The project focuses on three key areas: prevention, collaboration and employing a multi-level approach to community involvement. DELTA is currently underway in Carbon, Hill and Ravalli Counties and Missoula.

  • Seven Sisters Native Coalition

  • The Montana Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence has received funding from the U.S. Department of Justice to create a Native American Coalition in Montana. Currently in the development state, this new Coalition will focus on meeting the needs of domestic violence and sexual assault victims on the 7 Indian reservations in the state.
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    Nebraska

  • Improving Communities' Response to Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault
    The project, a collaboration between the Attorney General's Office, State Patrol, and Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Coalition, uses law enforcement statistics and victim impact panels to develop regional training for local agencies. The project also determines the compliance of local agencies with state domestic violence statutory requirements and provides assistance to domestic violence and sexual assault response teams.


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    Nevada

    No current projects.


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    New Hampshire

    No current projects.


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    New Jersey

  • Evaluation of SANE/SART Program
    The Office of the Attorney General's Department of Law and Public Safety is conducting an evaluation of the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner/Sexual Assault Response Team (SANE/SART) program operating statewide. The Office is gathering charging and sentencing data for the final analysis. A final evaluation report will be available.


  • International Exchange Program
    Strengthen Our Sisters provides training to international visitors interested in learning how to start and run a domestic violence shelter.


  • Self-sufficiency Women's Action Network (SWAN)
    Operated by Strengthen Our Sisters, SWAN is designed to provide job training and employment opportunities through the creation of SWAN businesses. The women are encouraged to participate as part of their plan to gain self-sufficiency and independence from their batterers and the welfare system. The businesses provide opportunities for job training and funds to employ some of the women and operate the shelter. Participants in SWAN also receive computer training, workshops in self-sufficiency, budgeting, resume writing, and job interview skills, and a car so they can get to and from work or school.


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    New Mexico

  • Evaluating the Deterrent Effect of Domestic Violence Orders of Protection
    The New Mexico Criminal Justice Analysis Center is conducting a study to evaluate the effectiveness of domestic violence orders of protection as a tool for mitigating the risk of subsequent victimization. This will entail an analysis of the state's protection order records and incident, arrest, and criminal history data to determine the influence of orders of protection on subsequent offenses and explore any observed deterrent effect over time, specifically focusing on whether deterrent effects continue after the orders expire. Research findings will assist local, state, and national efforts to more effectively utilize protective orders to reduce domestic violence.


  • Domestic Violence in the African American Community
    As part of the Safe Havens initiative funded through the Department of Justice's Office of Violence Against Women, Rainbow Research is working with the Institute for Domestic Violence in the African American Community to explore the extent to which African Americans, Native Americans and other people of color utilize supervised visitation programs in four distinct communities-Anadarko, OK; New Orleans, LA; Queens, NY and Zuni, NM - as well as review the culturally appropriate practices of these programs.


  • Violence, Alcohol, Substance Abuse, Tobacco Use (VAST)
    The New Mexico Department of Health is engaged in an initiative focusing on four major issues that impact the quality of life for New Mexicans: violence (family violence and domestic violence), alcohol, substance abuse, and tobacco use. New Mexico health workers use the V.A.S.T. screening questionnaire to identify problems throughout the state and to conduct further assessments. Public health and health provider settings should be safe places to identify the people who are affected by these issues, to assess the extent and depth of the problem, and, if needed, to provide further assistance or referrals.


  • South Valley Male Involvement Project
    The New Mexico Department of Health's Family Planning Program is implementing a male reproductive health project, the South Valley Male Involvement Project (SVMIP), in the South Valley area of Bernalillo County. The SVMIP provides information, education, and an opportunity for community members to access coordinated preventive health care services to improve the health and well-being of men and boys. The goals of the project are to:
    • Improve educational and clinical services for men of all ages in the South Valley
    • Reduce the risk behaviors that lead to unintended pregnancy and HIV and STDs
    • Decrease the prevalence of violence, pregnancy and STDs among teens 15-19 in the South Valley
    The SVMIP provides education at middle schools, high schools, and detention centers. Outreach activities include basketball tournaments, a locally produced play, and radio and television spots.


  • Violence Against Women Central Repository
    The New Mexico Courts Information Center received a STOP Violence Against Women grant to create a central repository of protective order data accessible to state and national law enforcement agencies. A public Web site will also allow users to search the database.


  • Statewide Domestic Violence Coalition Data Collection System Project
    The New Mexico Coalition Against Domestic Violence is working with service providers on the development of a statewide data collection system for the Family Violence Prevention Fund. The system was completed in 2008.


  • Colleague Network
    The New Mexico Clearinghouse on Sexual Abuse and Assault Services has developed a database of professionals throughout New Mexico who are involved in the investigation, prosecution, treatment, judicial administration, and prevention of sexual abuse and sexual assault. The Colleague Network includes experienced advocates, clergy, lawyers, judges, medical professionals, law enforcement, forensic scientists, teachers, counselors, principals, and trainers who can address the specific needs of anyone involved in a sexual abuse or sexual assault case.


  • President's Family Justice Center Initiative
    The PFJCI is a pilot program administered by the Office on Violence Against Women that has awarded more than $20 million to 15 communities across the country for the planning, development, and establishment of comprehensive domestic violence victim service and support centers. The goal of the PFJCI is to make a victim's search for help and justice more efficient and effective by bringing professionals who provide an array of services together under one roof. The Somos Familia Family Justice Center provides services from a variety of on-site partners.
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    New York

  • Testing the Efficacy of Judicial Monitoring: A Randomized Trial at the Rochester Domestic Violence Courts
    While judicial monitoring has been shown to be effective with other criminal justice populations, few studies, and none involving a randomized control design, have been conducted with domestic violence offenders. This study will fill this gap through a randomized trial to determine the efficacy of a carefully designed, robust model of judicial monitoring. In addition to examining the impact of monitoring on official recidivism and victim reports of re-abuse, the study will also examine the impact on intervening offender perceptions regarding the swiftness, certainty, and severity of further sanctions in response to violations of the court's orders.


  • Improving Services for Women with Disabilities Who Are Abused: A Collaborative Project
    The New York State Coalition Against Domestic Violence is partnering with the Center for Disability Rights and the Empire Justice Center (formerly known as the Greater Upstate Law Project) to improve services for women with disabilities who are abused. The Grant to End Violence Against Women with Disabilities is an exciting and unique statewide initiative that allows the three organizations to help create an informed, educated, and interconnected community of domestic violence and disability rights advocates in New York State who provide services to women with disabilities who are abused. The overall goal of the project is to reduce or eliminate the physical, programmatic, and attitudinal barriers that hinder women with disabilities' access to, and utilization of, essential crisis and support services. With this in mind, this collaborative project will:
    • provide technical assistance and education
    • develop a series of cross-trainings for domestic violence and disability advocates
    • create a comprehensive training curriculum and resource materials
    • develop a comprehensive self-assessment tool to assist domestic violence shelters and programs in evaluating their architectural and programmatic accessibility
    • establish a Listserv for the exchange of information, ideas, and resources among domestic violence program advocates, disability-related service organizations, and service providers for the deaf.
  • New York State Probation Domestic Violence Intervention Project
    The NYS Division of Probation and Correctional Alternatives (DPCA) collaborated with the NYS Office for the Prevention of Domestic Violence and the New York State Coalition Against Domestic Violence to implement a joint project designed to assist local probation departments in providing a more consistent legal system response to abused women and domestic violence offenders, promote collaboration within communities and across agencies, and foster relationships with local domestic violence advocates. Originally developed under a U.S Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women, Grants to Encourage Arrest Policies and Enforcement of Protection Orders Program, DPCA's statewide network of Probation Domestic Violence Liaisons from each county probation department and a Domestic Violence Workgroup continue to function as advisors in the design and implementation of model policies, procedures and protocols in response to domestic violence.


  • New York State Victim Assistance Academy
    The New York State Victim Assistance Academy, sponsored by the NYS Coalition Against Sexual Assault, is an interdisciplinary, academically-based learning experience for crime victim service providers, advocates, and allied professionals. It provides a foundation in the principles and policies of victims' rights work and a comprehensive set of skills, knowledge, and resources to enable service providers to better meet the short- and long-term needs of crime victims in New York State.


  • Spas for Survivors
    The New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault is partnering with The Enterprising Kitchen to allow the public to donate spa baskets to survivors of sexual assault.


  • President's Family Justice Center Initiative
    The PFJCI, administered by the Office on Violence Against Women, has provided grants to establish comprehensive domestic violence victim service and support centers. The goal of the PFJCI is to make a victim's search for help and justice more efficient and effective by bringing professionals who provide an array of government and community services together under one roof. New York now has centers in Erie, Orange and Westchester counties and the boroughs of Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx.



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    North Carolina

  • Child Support Payments and Pending Domestic Violence Cases
    The Governor's Crime Commission Criminal Justice Analysis Center is conducting a research study to compare methods for increasing the filing rate for child support payments within the context of pending domestic violence cases in the courts. The study uses a quasi-experimental design in which some domestic violence victims with children receive a financial affidavit while others receive an information packet outlining the procedures for requesting child support. Court personnel are responsible for the distribution of materials and the Center will be analyzing the final aggregate data. The differing methods will be compared to determine the most effective means for increasing child support requests.


  • Automation Capabilities of Service Providers
    The Governor's Crime Commission Criminal Justice Analysis Center is assessing the automation capabilities and needs of the state-funded domestic violence and sexual assault provider programs. The study will collect baseline data to determine the readiness for development of an automated statewide data collection program.


  • Project Rainbow Net
    In the summer of 2003, the North Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence began a new initiative aimed at addressing domestic violence in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) relationships. The initiative, Project Rainbow Net, is a grassroots effort based on the insight of an advisory council made up of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered people who have an understanding of domestic violence in LGBT relationships and a desire to end it. Project Rainbow Net will provide a series of trainings to LGBT community groups and domestic violence service providers across the state in order to improve the state's response to LGBT survivors of domestic violence. Information will be gathered and disseminated to domestic violence programs and LGBT community groups working to address domestic violence in LGBT relationships.


  • Statewide Information System for Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault Programs
    The Governor's Crime Commission will be developing a statewide data collection system that captures information about the types of services provided by domestic violence and sexual assault agencies as well as methods for measuring the data to determine the impact or effectiveness of services on victims.


  • pdf document An Intersectional Analysis of Domestic Violence: Understanding the Help-Seeking Decisions of Marginalized Battered Women
    Researchers at Michigan State University are collecting data from women in an urban city in North Carolina to identify barriers to seeking services. The research will use interviews of the largely marginalized population to determine how and why women make the decision of whether or not to seek help.


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    North Dakota

  • Domestic Violence/Rape Crisis Grant Program
    North Dakota Department of Health provides grants to domestic violence and rape crisis service providers, law enforcement, prosecution, judicial, hospitals, and other agencies to address violent crimes against women.
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    Ohio

  • Ohio DELTA Project
    The Ohio Domestic Violence Network is using funding from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for local projects in Knox County, Lucas County, and Warren County, as well as for projects at the state level geared towards support and strengthen the state's response to domestic violence.
  • President's Family Justice Center Initiative
    The PFJCI is a pilot program administered by the Office on Violence Against Women that has awarded more than $20 million to 15 communities across the country for the planning, development, and establishment of comprehensive domestic violence victim service and support centers. The goal of the PFJCI is to make a victim's search for help and justice more efficient and effective by bringing professionals who provide an array of services together under one roof. The Family Justice Center of Northwest Ohio will provide services from a variety of on-site partners.


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    Oklahoma

  • Police Planning and Problem Solving Through Incident-Based Reporting Data
    Funded by the ASA/BJS Small Grants Research Program, researchers are analyzing incident-based reporting data to identify characteristics and trends in domestic violence cases. Researchers plan to use the findings to create a resource guide for local law enforcement agencies. The project began in June 2010 and will conclude October 31, 2012.


  • The Oklahoma Lethality Assessment Intervention Study
    Researchers at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, State of Oklahoma Department of Health, Arizona State University, and Johns Hopkins University are working together to evaluate the effectiveness of a brief 11-item Lethality Assessment and intervention protocol implemented by police officers, supported by social service providers, and conducted at the scene of a domestic violence incident. The study will determine whether this new approach will decrease the rates of repeat, lethal and near lethal intimate partner violence (IPV) and increase the rates of help seeking behaviors among IPV victims. Special attention will be paid to the interaction effects of race/ethnicity (especially Native American race/ethnicity), police jurisdiction, and arrest. Seven Oklahoma police departments along with DV service providers in their area are participating: Oklahoma City, Tulsa, Broken Arrow, El Reno, Stillwater, Tahlequah, Cherokee Nation Marshall Service.


  • Oklahoma Violent Death Reporting System
    Oklahoma is participating in the National Violent Death Reporting System. The Oklahoma Violent Death Reporting System (OKVDRS) collects data from death certificates, medical examiner (ME) reports, law enforcement reports, and Oklahoma Child Death Review Board data on all homicides, suicides, unintentional firearm deaths, undetermined manner deaths, and legal interventions. OK-VDRS data has been collected since 2004. The data are maintained by the Oklahoma State Department of Health Injury Prevention Service (IPS). The IPS assists the Oklahoma Domestic Violence Fatality Review Board in identifying cases of domestic violence homicide and provides death certificate data and copies of ME reports.


  • President's Family Justice Center Initiative
    The PFJCI is a pilot program administered by the Office on Violence Against Women that has awarded more than $20 million to 15 communities across the country for the planning, development, and establishment of comprehensive domestic violence victim service and support centers. The goal of the PFJCI is to make a victim's search for help and justice more efficient and effective by bringing professionals who provide an array of services together under one roof. The Ann Patterson Dooley Family Safety Center provides services from a variety of on-site partners.


  • STOP Violence Against Women Grant Program (VAWA)
    The purpose of the STOP VAWA Program is to develop and strengthen the criminal justice system's response to violence against women and to support and enhance services for victims. The Program encourages victim service providers, prosecutors, law enforcement, and the courts to implement coordinated multidisciplinary approaches to address domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking. The Oklahoma District Attorneys Council acts as the state administering agency for this federal grant program. Lists of annual awardees are available online.


  • Sexual Assault Services Program Grant (SASP)
    These funds support the establishment, maintenance, and expansion of sexual assault services by non-governmental victim services programs to assist those victimized by sexual assault. The purpose of the grant is to provide intervention, advocacy, accompaniment, support services, and related assistance for adult, youth, and child victims of sexual assault, family and household members of victims, and those collaterally affected by sexual assault other than perpetrators. Lists of annual awardees are available online.


  • Rural Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Sexual Assault, and Stalking Assistance Grant
    Unlike VAWA and SASP, this is a competitive discretionary grant awarded to the Oklahoma District Attorneys Council on behalf of five rural District Attorney Districts in Oklahoma. The primary purpose of the program is to enhance the safety of child, youth, and adult victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking by supporting projects uniquely designed to address and prevent these crimes in rural jurisdictions. This project funds prosecutors and investigators in rural jurisdictions who are assigned exclusively cases involving domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking and ensuring victim safety.


  • Safeline Program
    The Safeline is a toll-free accessible 24-hour hotline for individuals seeking help or information about domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking. It offers confidential calls with trained individuals who understand issues of domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking; assistance in safety planning; and referrals to crisis centers, shelters, and other state resources. Assistance is available in 150 languages. This service is maintained by the Oklahoma Office of the Attorney General.


  • Victim Information and Notification Everyday (VINE) Program
    VINE allows crime victims to obtain timely and reliable information about hearing dates and changes and the custody status of offenders 24 hours a day. Victims and other concerned citizens can also register to be notified by phone, email, text message, or TTY devices when an offender's custody status changes. Users register through participating state or county toll-free numbers. This service is maintained by the Oklahoma Office of the Attorney General.


  • Oklahoma Address Confidentiality Program (ACP)
    This program provides victims who have moved to a new location unknown to their abuser with a substitute address for use when interacting with state and local agencies. It also provides participants with a cost-free first-class mail forwarding service. The ACP allows the state to contribute to the safety of victims by denying abusers the opportunity to use public records as a means to violate the rights of others. This service is maintained by the Oklahoma Office of the Attorney General.


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    Oregon

    No current projects.


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    Pennsylvania

  • Evaluation of Victim Services Organizational Capacity Building Initiative

  • The National Center for State Courts is conducting an 18-month evaluation of the impact of organizational capacity building initiatives undertaken by five victim services agencies funded by the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency.

  • Assessing the Use of Pennsylvania's Victim Compensation Assistance Program

  • The Justice Research and Statistics Association is conducting this study to identify ways to increase the utilization of crime victim compensation in Pennsylvania. The objectives of the study are to: 1) assess Pennsylvania's current rate of utilization of crime victim compensation and compare this to the rates of other states; 2) identify, via literature review and data analysis, factors that are related to utilization of compensation programs; and 3) develop recommendations for improving the program.

  • Protection From Abuse Database

  • The Protection From Abuse Database (PFAD) Project is a computer archival system for the electronic entry of all pleadings and orders relating to Protection From Abuse (PFA) Act cases in Pennsylvania. Records from PFAD are immediately available 24 hours a day/365 days a year to authorized users via a secured Internet Web site. PFAD staff provides trainings to users. These include on-site training in counties that are just beginning to use PFAD and those counties that require supplemental training. Staff also trains local law enforcement throughout the Commonwealth and provides training on PFAD´s indirect criminal contempt and civil contempt processes.

  • Evaluation of the Protection From Abuse Database Project

  • The National Center for State Courts conducted an evaluation of Pennsylvania's Protection From Abuse Database (PFAD). The 18-month project, funded by the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency, addressed the following issues: (1) PFAD usage; (2) user satisfaction and victim safety; and (3) data transmission and system integration. A local advisory board guided the project.

  • Evaluation of the STOP Violence Against Women Training Project

  • The University of Pittsburgh will assess the impact of the training project on the implementation of the STOP grant in participating counties. This will include an impact evaluation of the outcomes associated with the training, an identification of best practices in the existing statewide program, and development of a set of performance measures to aid in establishing guidelines for future training programs.

  • Protection Order Enforcement Project

  • The Protection Order Enforcement Project is a statewide initiative designed to provide training and technical assistance to counties throughout Pennsylvaniaia in an effort to ensure that protection orders are enforced consistently with Pennsylvania law. Funded by PCCD, PCADV staff offer no-cost assistance to constituencies charged with the implementation of the Protection From Abuse Act. In addition, six pilot sites representing the diversity of Pennsylvania's 67 counties have been identified to receive more intensive services. In collaboration with these counties' STOP implementationon teams and Criminal Justice Advisory Boards, training and technical support are geared to the unique issues of each of the six counties. The project also addresses Pennsylvania's underserved communities by offering training on the issues unique to identifying and serving those who traditionally do not seek, or cannot access, domestic violence services.

  • Civil Legal Representation

  • The Civil Legal Representation (CLR) Project enhances access to civil legal assistance and justice for victims of domestic violence. CLR attorneys assist survivors´ attorneys in obtaining court intervention that enhances a victim´s self-sufficiency, while also concentrating on her safety needs. CLR attorneys are engaged in effecting systematic legal change. With support from the CLR staff, CLR attorneys around the state have completed and filed appeals in the Pennsylvania Superior and Supreme Court. Staff also provides moot court opportunities for those attorneys who have filed appeals and are preparing for oral argument. The Domestic Violence Attorney Network, composed of CLR staff and CLR attorneys from around the state, meets on a regular basis throughout the year for training and information sharing.

  • Prevention of Dating Violence Among Runaway & Homeless Youth

  • This project, which began in October 2005, represents a partnership between the Mid-Atlantic Network of Youth and Family Services and PCADV. It involves runaway and homeless youth programs and domestic violence programs throughout Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia. This collaborative project was made possible by a grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

  • Enhancing Services for Children & Youth Exposed to Domestic Violence

  • Beginning in 2006, PCADV launched a project to expand the capacity of Pennsylvania domestic violence program staff to address the needs of children and adolescents and to support abused parents' efforts to build resiliency in their children. The program is designed to enhance intervention services that are focused on strengthening the abused parent-child relationship, demonstrated to be beneficial in addressing the trauma associated with a child's exposure to a batterer. With funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, five different programs were chosen as demonstration sites, based on diversity of geography, services offered, type of program, populations served, program quality and competency of the children´s advocate. These programs implemented 12-week home/community-based services to families, focused on helping the non-abusive parent understand and address the needs and behaviors of children resulting from exposure to domestic violence.

  • Medical Advocacy

  • Since 1993, PCADV Medical Advocacy Project has coordinated collaborative partnerships of community-based domestic violence programs and local health care systems/medical facilities to promote health care-based identification of domestic violence victims seeking health care services or treatment and the provision of support, information, education, resources and follow-up services within the health care setting.

  • PA STOP Violence Against Women and Judicial Training

  • PCADV provides training and technical assistance to the 46 STOP Grant counties in Pennsylvania. Training topics for STOP team members, consisting of law enforcement, prosecutors and victims service providers, include the Protection From Abuse Act and its recent amendments, stalking, firearms and primary aggressor issues. A STOP newsletter is published and distributed to STOP grant teams on a quarterly basis. Training and technical assistance are also provided to domestic violence advocates around the Commonwealth. Regularly scheduled Legal Advocacy Committee meetings provide an opportunity for advocates to obtain training and share information and strategies to better assist victims of domestic violence and their children. A weekly electronic update further provides these advocates with current information to support their efforts.

  • Welfare Project

  • The PCADV Welfare Project is a partnership with the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare (DPW) to implement federal legislation mandating county welfare offices to do the following:
    • Screen for domestic violence
    • Waive welfare program requirements that may place the victim and/or the children in danger
    • Refer clients for domestic violence services
    Under the guidance of the PCADV/DPW Domestic Violence Task Force, the following on-going activities occur: development and implementation of DPW policies that affect victims receiving public benefits; domestic violence awareness training for all welfare caseworkers and clerical support staff; cross-training of advocates on DPW policy; technical assistance to domestic violence program staff regarding welfare issues; and the development of written materials to support welfare advocacy.

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    Rhode Island

  • A Statewide Study of Stalking and its Criminal Justice Response Grant 2007-WG-BX-0003
    This study will explore the impact of identifying and charging for the crime of stalking in the state of Rhode Island on offender accountability as measured by successful prosecution as well as victim safety, as measured by re-arrest for domestic violence within two years. Researchers will use a multi-methods approach that includes secondary data analysis of a mandated law enforcement reporting system as well as court-based data regarding prosecution and qualitative interviews with select Rhode Island law enforcement officers, prosecutors, defense lawyers and court advocates for a more complete understanding of the factors influencing the criminal justice response to stalking. The researcher plans to explore answers to the question, "Does identifying the crime of stalking have an effect on prosecution outcomes, as well as longer terms outcomes in regard to subsequent arrests for domestic violence?" A sample of 1,297 incident and arrest reports where citations have been made by police for threats and harassment between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2005, will be reviewed to extract those cases where stalking charges should have been brought against the suspects. These extracted cases will be compared with 140 cases during the same period where the suspects were actually cited for stalking. Comparisons will be made on a variety of characteristics, with the end result being the development of a more complete profile of stalkers. Qualitative interviews (group) with 30 key informants from smaller cities in Rhode Island will be conducted to assess factors that may influence the criminal justice response to stalking.


  • Rhode Island Violent Death Reporting System
    The Rhode Island Department of Health will be comparing the violent deaths in the Rhode Island Violent Death Reporting System with the data collected by the Rhode Island Supreme Court's Domestic Violence Training and Monitoring Unit to determine the proportion of victims of violent death who were victims or perpetrators of domestic violence in the 12 months prior to death.


  • Rhode Island Child Death Review
    The Rhode Island Department of Health will be comparing the violent child deaths in the Rhode Island Violent Death Reporting System with the data collected by the Rhode Island Supreme Court's Domestic Violence Training and Monitoring Unit to determine whether children who live in homes with police-reported domestic violence have an increased risk of death from all causes.


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    South Carolina

  • Effectiveness of Sex Offender Registration and Notification Policies in Reducing Sexual Violence Against Women
    The purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of sex offender registration and community notification policies in reducing sexual violence against women and girls. To date, effects of broad sex offender registration and notification policies have been almost entirely exempt from empirical review. The present study will evaluate sex offender registration and notification policies as applied in South Carolina to determine whether these policies have deterred new sexual offenses or reduced sexual recidivism. Additionally, this study will examine whether an unintended effect has occurred; that is, whether the prosecution or conviction of individuals arrested for serious sexual offenses might have declined since policy implementation, perhaps due to perceived harshness of these policies. Because general crime rates have declined over the past decade, data on robbery and aggravated assault will also be examined to control for reductions in sex offenses.


  • Evaluating the Effectiveness of Sex Offender Registration and Notification Policies for Reducing Sexual Violence Against Women. Grant 2006-WT-BX-0001
    The study examines the effectiveness of sex offender registration and community notification policies in reducing sexual violence against women and girls. Because registration and notification policies were federally mandated and have been implemented across the country, they represent the most comprehensive attempts at the prevention and reduction of serious sexual violence. To date, the effects of broad registration and notification policies (e.g., policies that do not distinguish between different offender risk levels and that apply for life) have been almost entirely exempt from empirical review. The present study will evaluate broad sex offender registration and notification policies as applied in South Carolina to determine whether these policies have deterred new sexual offenses (Aim 1) or reduced sexual recidivism (Aim 2). Additionally, this study will examine whether an unintended effect has occurred: that is, whether the prosecution or conviction of individuals arrested for serious sexual offenses might have declined since policy implementation, perhaps due to perceived harshness of these polices (Aim 3). Because general crime rates have declined over the past decade, data on robbery and aggravated assault will also be examined in the context of some analyses to control for reductions in sex offenses that might be due to non-specific factors. Data from 1991 to 2003 to be analyzed include all South Carolina "registry" sexual offense charges and convictions; all robbery and aggravated assault charges and convictions (for comparison); and victim reports of sexual offenses (also for comparison purposes). Patterns of pre-policy (1991-1995) charges and convictions will be compared with post-registration policy data (1996-1999) and with post-Internet notification policy data (2000-2003). This study will represent the first empirical examination of broad registration and notification polices, such as were implemented by approximately half of all U.S. states. These policies have been in effect for over a decade, and examination of their effectiveness is overdue.


  • Domestic Violence Disposition Data
    In January 2006, enhanced sanctions for several criminal domestic violence offenses went into effect in the state, including increased sentence length, mandatory minimum sentences, and increased fines and court assessments. As a result, there is concern that offenders may be charged with non-domestic violence offenses in order to avoid the more stringent sanctions attached to domestic violence offenses. The South Carolina Law Enforcement Division (SLED) and the State Budget Control Board's Office of Research and Statistics (ORS) are collaborating to collect criminal domestic violence disposition data from 2005 and 2006 to compare dispostion outcomes between the two years to determine how often and in what manner criminal domestic violence arrest charges change.


  • Juvenile Sexual Violence Victims
    The South Carolina Law Enforcement Division (SLED) is also using incident-based law enforcement data to conduct a study of sexual violence on victims under the age of 18. When conducting a previous report of sexual violence, it became apparent that sexual violence victimization rates amont the younger age groups significantly exceeded the rates among older age groups. The Division will therefore be conducting a more detailed examination of sexual violence among young victims.



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    South Dakota

    No current projects.

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    Tennessee

  • Cultural Competency Project
    The Cultural Competency Project addresses access, language and cultural barriers faced by immigrant and refugee victims and works to enhance culturally competent domestic violence and sexual assault services. The project seeks ways to improve services to immigrant, refugee and trafficked victims of domestic violence and sexual assault in Tennessee, to increase collaboration between DV/SA programs and organizations that serve immigrant communities, and to increase the understanding of issues that affect immigrant victims among DV/SA programs and organizations that serve immigrants.


  • Law Enforcement Training Project
    This project was designed to develop consistent, ongoing domestic violence response training statewide. The Tennessee Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence provides technical assistance to law enforcement agencies on policy development and law implementation. The Coalition also conducts 40-hour specialized domestic violence and sexual assault schools and provides a manual of updated laws.


  • Rural Domestic Violence Project
    This project funds outreach workers who provide services to domestic violence victims in 15 underserved rural communities.


  • Social Norms Project
    The overall purpose of the Social Norms Project is to create a prevention campaign about sexual violence among youth. In order to accomplish this goal effectively, the Tennessee Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence will first examine and assess what Tennessee youths believe sexual violence is and how they feel about it. Once these beliefs are understood, the project can determine the best way to help prevent sexual assault.


  • Tennessee Victim Assistance Academy
    The Tennessee Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence has received a three-year federal grant from the Office for Victims of Crime to develop, implement and evaluate a Tennessee-specific victim assistance academy. The Coalition will coordinate, plan and implement the Academy with support from the Victims of Crime State Coordinating Council, the Office of Criminal Justice Programs, the State Treasurer's Office and the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.


  • Victims of Crime State Coordinating Council
    The Tennessee Victims of Crime State Coordinating Council has been established to promote awareness of the needs of victims of crime and their families and to coordinate and assist the efforts of victims' rights organizations. The Council does not provide direct services assistance to individual victims or families of victims, but instead refers victims and/or will advise victims of available resources.


  • President's Family Justice Center Initiative
  • The PFJCI is a pilot program administered by the Office on Violence Against Women that has awarded more than $20 million to 15 communities across the country for the planning, development, and establishment of comprehensive domestic violence victim service and support centers. The goal of the PFJCI is to make a victim's search for help and justice more efficient and effective by bringing professionals who provide an array of services together under one roof. The Knoxville Family Justice Center brings together over 60 partners to provide services to domestic violence victims.


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    Texas

  • Child and Adolescent Counseling Program Evaluation for SafePlace
    The Child and Adolescent Counseling Program at SafePlace provides counseling to children and adolescents who have experienced domestic and/or sexual violence. Services provided to clients include individual counseling, play therapy with younger children, crisis intervention, long-term counseling, and peer support groups. Given current services offered, the Institute on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault will be conducting an evaluation of the program's assessment tools and observation methods to assess their suitability for evaluating client outcomes.


  • Evaluation of the BabySafe Program
    TThis project's purpose is to evaluate the BabySafe Program, an outreach program for pregnant women who are experiencing domestic violence, offered by SafePlace, Austin, TX. Institute on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault project staff will refine measures to evaluate two components of the BabySafe program: 1) training offered to medical and professional staff by BabySafe program staff, and 2) the impact of the program and the achievement of program objectives, if needed. After data analysis, the principal investigator and project staff will produce a final report.


  • Family con Voz
    This Migrant Clinicians Network project is a peer-led family violence community education project in Maverick and Presidio counties, empowering community members to become advocates, or promotoras, who speak out against family violence.


  • Program Representing Immigrant Survivors of Abuse
    PRISA began in 1995 as an initiative of the Political Asylum Project of Austin to provide immigration legal services to battered immigrants and children. Project staff provide outreach and education to social service providers, members of the faith community and law enforcement officials on the legal remedies available to battered immigrants under the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), and their role and responsibility as advocates for immigrant victims of domestic violence.


  • President's Family Justice Center Initiative
    The PFJCI is a pilot program administered by the Office on Violence Against Women that has awarded more than $20 million to 15 communities across the country for the planning, development, and establishment of comprehensive domestic violence victim service and support centers. The goal of the PFJCI is to make a victim's search for help and justice more efficient and effective by bringing professionals who provide an array of services together under one roof. The Bexar County Family Justice Center provides services from a variety of on-site partners.


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    Utah

  • Visitation Center for Children of Domestic Violence Victims
    The Utah Attorney General's Office created the state's first nonprofit visitation and exchange center for victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking, and their children. The All-R-Kids Center provides monitored exchanges where the visiting parent is carefully supervised, and guidelines are in place to ensure there is no contact between parents. The center was made possible by grants from the U.S. Department of Justice/Office on Violence Against Women.


  • Sexual Assault Response Team (SART) Feedback Form
    The Utah Coalition Against Sexual Assault is evaluating sexual assault victims' system of care, including the sexual assault nurse examination, rape crisis advocacy, and response by law enforcement and hospital services personnel.


  • Sexual Violence Awareness Within the Community of Developmentally Disabled Adults
    The Utah Coalition Against Sexual Assault is measuring the effectiveness of sexual violence intervention and prevention efforts designed for developmentally disabled adults and their caregivers.



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    Vermont

    No current projects.


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    Virginia

  • Project RADAR
    Project RADAR is a provider-focused initiative to promote the assessment and prevention of intimate partner violence in the health care setting. Through the RADAR initiative, the Center for Injury & Violence Prevention at the Virginia Department of Health seeks to enable Virginia's health care providers to recognize and respond to intimate partner violence (IPV) by providing them access to:
    • "best-practice" policies, guidelines, and assessment tools
    • training programs and specialty-specific curricula
    • awareness and educational materials
    • information on the latest research/data related to IPV

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    Washington

  • Domestic Violence Indicator
    The Washington State Criminal Justice Information Support is working toward the addition of a domestic violence indicator to its crime reporting system. The state is also working on adding the offense of Violation of No Contact/Protection Order to its NIBRS program.


  • Disability Advocacy Project
    The Washington Coalition Against Domestic Violence develops training curricula, service protocols, and models for collaboration that will increase and enhance support and advocacy for people with disabilities who are victims of domestic violence.


  • Prison Rape Elimination
    The Washington State Department of Corrections was awarded a grant and has subcontracted to the Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs to create curricula and provide training in the areas of inmate orientation, staff training and investigations for both adult and juvenile facilities.


  • The Black People's Project
    The Black People's Project, created by Communities Against Rape and Abuse, develops creative and radical ways to challenge rape culture as it connects to the experience of being black in America. This includes presentations, curricula, and peer education about the American slave trade and culture; lynching movements at the turn of the 20th century and in contemporary USA; sexual abuse, torture and continued assaults on the black body as "object" and subject of loathing; disproportionality; the Criminal Justice System: police brutality, the prison industrial complex, the death penalty; and economic justice.


  • The Disability Pride Project
    The Disability Pride Project, created by Communities Against Rape and Abuse, generates radical action against violence and oppression within the disabilities community. The project challenges the oppressive stereotypes that surround this community and explores ways of resistance that are educational, creative, and political. The Disability Pride Project increases the community's capacity to support survivors of sexual violence and bolsters community efforts to promote safety, support and liberation in a manner that challenges rape and oppression. This goal is achieved by fostering education through critical dialogue, strengthening coalitions between people with disabilities and our allies, and by supporting community action that increases awareness of sexual violence, safety, and informed decision-making.


  • The Young People's Liberation Project
    Communities Against Rape and Abuse's Young People's Liberation Project supports young people organizing for safety, support, and liberation. The agency works creatively and collectively to challenge rape, abuse, and oppression. This project is a resource for young people who want to create support for young survivors of rape and abuse, as well as young people who want to work to end all forms of violence and oppression through activism and community-organizing.


  • Beyond the Prison Industrial Complex
    Communities Against Rape and Abuse organizes and is led by communities that are marginalized from the approach of strengthening the criminal justice system's response to sexual violence. The project works to create community-based systems of accountability and support in order to build healthy relationships and communities free of both interpersonal and state violence.

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    West Virginia

  • West Virginia Regional Mobile SANE Program
    The West Virginia Foundation for Rape Information and Services evaluated the needs of the rural areas of the state and discovered that victims in many rural communities were provided limited and unequal access to medical care resources and facilities, which often resulted in unequal access to proper forensic examinations. This led to the development of a mobile program, serving four hospitals in four counties and providing 24/7 services to victims of sexual assault through a collaboration of financial and programmatic resources.


  • The Role of Domestic Violence Orders of Protection in Arrests
    The Division of Criminal Justice Services' Statistical Analysis Center is conducting a study to explore the role of protective orders in influencing arrests in domestic violence incidents and to examine the influence of other legal and non-legal characteristics of the offense as well as the demographic characteristics of the perpetrators and victims. A written report will also be available.


  • Violence Against Women Program Evaluations
    The Division of Criminal Justice Services' Statistical Analysis Center evaluates the state Violence Against Women STOP teams and the Rural Domestic Violence and Child Victimization Grant program. All evaluations are available from its Web site.


  • West Virginia Rural Domestic Violence and Child Victimization Enforcement Program
    Recognizing that abused women and children living in rural West Virginia are faced with unique barriers to receiving assistance, the Division of Criminal Justice Services has provided financial assistance to the West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence to better research and serve diverse and traditionally underserved populations in rural communities statewide. Project activities focus on four underserved populations that exist in rural communities throughout West Virginia: elderly, disabled, racial minorities, and gay and lesbian communities.


  • West Virginia Intercollegiate Council on Sexual Violence
    The Intercollegiate Council began as a vision to establish a campus consortium to work collectively on the issue of sexual violence on the campuses of West Virginia's residential colleges and universities. The mission of the council is to significantly reduce sexual offenses through the development of educational strategies, improvement of victim service responses, facilitation of information exchange and impact on policy-making.


  • Responsible Education for Self-Protection, Establishing Confidence and Trust (RESPECT)
    RESPECT is a school-based curriculum designed to provide adolescent students grades 7-12 with the information and skills needed to prevent violence in their relationships now and in the future. Each of the five units provides class lesson plans, background information, handouts, activities, and an evaluation tool. RESPECT is designed to raise awareness and understanding about relationship violence through interactive lessons that include role plays, videos, discussions and special activities.

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    Wisconsin

  • Safe Haven Visitation and Exchange Plan Implementation Project
    This project provides assistance for families experiencing domestic violence, sexual assault, child abuse, and stalking. Four of the 34 state service providers are receiving funds to expand services, enhance safety, and increase center staff. In addition to the mandated OJP technical support, training and technical assistance to the four implementation sites are provided by subcontracts from the Children's Trust Fund to the Wisconsin Coalition Against Sexual Assault, the Wisconsin Coalition Against Domestic Violence, and Kieffer Consultation and Facilitation.


  • Rural Domestic Violence and Child Victimization
    In this project, the Wisconsin Office of Justice Assistance is establishing a Member Services Rural Advocacy Partnership project to strengthen the Wisconsin Coalition Against Domestic Violence's (WCADV) rural programs.

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    Wyoming

  • Comprehensive Needs Assessment for the Prevention of Sexual Violence
    The Wyoming Survey and Analysis Center (WYSAC) is working with the Wyoming Division of Victim Services and Wyoming's Sexual Violence Prevention Planning Committee to complete a comprehensive needs assessment of sexual violence in the state. This research involves creating an inventory of all existing data sources and indicators related to sexual violence as well as developing data profiles around important research questions. This includes profiling the perpetrators and victims of sexual violence, the types of sexual violence in Wyoming, and an exploration of possible risk and protective factors. This assessment will inform Wyoming's statewide plan to prevent sexual violence.


  • Domestic Violence Study
    The Wyoming Survey and Analysis Center (WYSAC) is conducting statistical analyses on the Wyoming Domestic Violence Reporting Program (WDVRP) data. This project will give Wyoming policymakers an in-depth look at domestic violence in Wyoming. The intent of this project is to conduct three types of data analysis on the 1999 - 2003 Wyoming domestic violence data, which are collected by the Wyoming Division of Criminal Investigations. First, a thorough descriptive analysis of the 1999 - 2003 domestic violence data will be conducted. Second, a logistic regression analysis will be conducted to look at the effect of the number of prior domestic violence contacts on the responses of law enforcement officials and, ultimately, how prior domestic violence contacts influence law enforcement's decision to arrest. Third, a logistic regression analysis will be conducted to look at the effect of several incident-related variables (type of weapon, victim/offender relationship, time of day, victim or offender sex, etc.) on the type of violence a victim suffers.


  • Domestic Violence Intake Form Project
    The Wyoming Survey and Analysis Center (WYSAC) is also working with the Office of the Attorney General's Division of Victim Services to develop a standardized intake form. WYSAC will conduct a comprehensive needs assessment of the data collection requirements of the 24 domestic violence programs across the state. This will entail surveying each service provider organization and collecting their current intake forms for review and analysis. Once this critical information is gathered, WYSAC researchers will begin work to develop a single, standardized intake form for the providers. This will involve analyzing and synthesizing Wyoming-based information with current research on best practices in domestic violence data collection across the nation to develop a draft standardized intake form.


  • Domestic Violence Education Project
    The Wyoming Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault and the University of Wyoming College of Law provide a Legal Services domestic violence clinic. Each semester, four student interns are assigned to represent victims of domestic violence in obtaining family violence protection orders, stalking orders, or divorces, or in custody matters. The Legal Services Program also includes training in developing client counseling skills and representing abused women.


  • Rural Outreach Project
    The Wyoming Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault is working with local communities and the Wind River Reservation to identify and correct gaps in services and barriers to services.


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